What My Daughters Taught Me

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More About This Title What My Daughters Taught Me

English

"Without a word spoken, mothers effortlessly read a room, gauging its temperature, scanning their children's faces and measuring their heartbeats . . . This is the language of love, a language that should not be the monopoly of mothers. It is a language that we men can reclaim and relearn, as it lies dormant within us, waiting to be brought back to life. I was sure that whoever gave women this gift would not have bypassed fathers, in case they ended up like me."

When Joseph Wakim's wife died of breast cancer in 2003, his three daughters were only eleven, nine and four years old. Despite well-meaning friends, family and even strangers telling him he would need help to bring up his daughters, Joseph followed his heart and did the job his way, trusting that he - and the girls - would know what to do. To stop himself from succumbing to grief and taking his daughters with him, Joseph relied on humor and honesty as they all learned to live again and celebrate life, while honoring the memory of his beloved wife, Nadia. Twelve years later, the family is thriving, and Joseph and his daughters have learned hard and valuable truths about each other - and themselves. This moving and engaging memoir will touch the hearts of parents and children everywhere, and may even provide some secrets to family harmony that we can all share.

English

Joseph Wakim is a widowed father of three daughters. From psychologist to social worker, he founded the Streetwork Project in Adelaide, the Australian Arabic Council, produced TV documentary Zero to Zenith: Arab Contributions Down Under, wrote four satirical comedies that were staged in Melbourne, founded Australia's first Arabic Festival (Mahrajan), was appointed Victoria's youngest Multicultural Affairs Commissioner, and composed music for his band The Heartbeats. He was granted the Violence Prevention Award by Commonwealth Heads of Government in 1996 and the Order of Australia Medal for public campaigns to redress the roots of racism in 2001. His debut book Sorry We Have No Space was 2014 finalist for Australian Christian Book of the Year. He has had over 600 opinion pieces published in all major Australian newspapers and was finalist at the United Nations Australia Association - Media Award 2014 for creating a "voice for the voiceless." Most of his opinion pieces can be viewed via www.josephwakim.com.au and can be followed on Twitter @WakimJ
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