The Pet Hawk of the House of Abbas

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English

The first book in Russia's acclaimed Silk Road Trilogy, available in English for the first time, is full of mystery, memorable characters, and nonstop adventure. In the heart of the world, where empires collide, Nanidat Maniakh, a dashing trader, is enjoying the good life as head of a powerful silk dynasty. Yet Fate has other plans: Nanidat's world is suddenly torn asunder by murder and revolution, and the fate of his homeland hangs in the balance. Overnight, this able merchant must become a cunning warrior and spy, while eluding assassins, negotiating with kings, and pursuing a long-lost love. This thrilling and rich historical thriller, set in 749 CE—in the part of the world we now know as Iran, Iraq, and Central Asia—vividly re-creates a lost world, yet its passions and conflicts are entirely relevant to the present day.

English

Dmitry Chen is the pseudonym for a Russian author who has been observing and writing about Asia for more than 30 years. He has published seven novels and a variety of short stories. His Silk Road Trilogy was immensely popular in Russia and earned him a reputation as the most "foreign" writer in contemporary Russian literature. Liv Bliss has been a freelance translator, editor, and language consultant since the 1970s. Her translation of Godsdoom: The Book of Hagen by Nick Perumov was published in 2007. She lives in the White Mountains of Arizona.

English

“Set in a time of seismic dynastic change in the story of Islam . . . an exotic world of old is brought back to fevered life with plot twists aplenty in a drama as lethal as a jeweled assassin’s knife.”  —Benson Bobrick, author, The Caliph's Splendor: Islam and the West in the Golden Age of Baghdad"Not only a best-selling tale of action and adventure but also a surprisingly poetic book, and in that unexpected coupling of poetry and hard-bitten thriller lies all its charm . . . Chen's books are of course easy to read, but they are also irreproachably historically accurate and literally bursting at the seams with offbeat and often eye-opening information."  —Diplomat
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