The Little Breadwinner
Award-winning author, Lucia Mann Is the Recipient of More Than 10 Book Awards, and was born in South Africa, and is a citizen of Britain and Canada.

Rights Contact Login For More Details

More About This Title The Little Breadwinner

English

Finding Hope and Survival in The Midst of War

FROM 1980 TO 1992, A TURBULENT CIVIL WAR ravaged the Central American state of El Salvador, claiming the lives of approximately 75,000 Salvadorans. The Little Breadwinner is a story of tyrannized, frightened families—mostly poor peasants, indigenous peoples, and child farm workers—whose lives signified nothing to the military death squads.

Lucia Mann, who was in El Salvador at the time, recalls this vivid historical portrait of human rights violations during and after the “dirty” war between the military-led government and left-wing Farabundo Martí National Liberation Front. This brutal conflict was backed politically, economically, and militarily by the United States with CIA involvement.

Throughout these pages, you will experience intense trials of courageous survival with unforgettable characters who yearn for peace, justice, and normalcy. One of the brave women you will meet is Estella Godwin Lozano (a Waorani tribe descendant of the Amazon rain forest), who suffered terribly before her brutal demise in Laredo, Texas in 2019. She was a “little person” who became traumatically affected by the abuse perpetrated by National Guard soldiers outside her pueblo home. She heroically joined the Sandinistas (Cuban-backed guerillas) to seek revenge upon the villains of her country.

English

Meet Lucia Mann
Journalist and novelist Lucia Mann is an inspirational writer and social activist. Her books and writings are recognized internationally, and she is well known as one of the leading advocates for the abolition of human trafficking and slavery.

After retiring from journalism, Lucia moved to rural in British Columbia, Canada, where she has been writing prolifically giving voice to those who have suffered, and still suffer, the brutalities of war and social injustice. Her books and writings are relevant and often shocking, but they shine an important light on the ongoing worldwide struggles.

About Lucia Mann
Lucia Mann PhotoLucia Man is Sicilian-bred, born in British Colonial South Africa in the wake of WWII. She is a citizen of Britain and Canada who recently applied for a U.S. Green Card because she believes she is an American at heart. She was educated in London, England and retired from freelance journalism in 1998.

After suffering from racial prejudice most of her early life because she was part Italian and part South African, she saw and felt firsthand the pain and suffering of those who were thought to be inferior because of the color of their skin. Her mission is to end prejudice and slavery now and in the future.

A woman was recently sentenced to 140 months in prison after using two Nigerian immigrants as personal unpaid servants in her luxury home in Atlanta, Georgia. A few days later, two Ukrainian brothers were convicted of smuggling desperate villagers into the United States to work long hours, cleaning retail stores and office buildings at little or no pay. The prosecuting U.S. attorney in Philadelphia, Daniel Velez, said it was “modern-day slavery. It’s hiding in plain sight.” However, according to a woman who lived through the racial prejudice, segregation and slavery in post-World War II Europe, the slavery crisis in the modern world is far greater than that. “Anyone who thinks slavery died when America abolished it in the 1800s has a shock coming to them,” said Lucia Mann, whose mother was a sex slave and a WWII concentration camp survivor.

Lucia Mann PhotoMann, a former journalist and author of Africa's Unfinished Symphony, A Veil of Blood Hangs Over Africa, and Rented Silence—a novel about slavery and racial prejudice based on her life experiences and those of other persecuted souls she witnessed says, “According to the United Nations, there are more than 27 million slaves worldwide, which are more than twice the number of those who were enslaved over the 400 years that transatlantic slavers trafficked humans to work in the Americas. Many are forced into prostitution while others are used as unpaid laborers used to manufacture goods many of us buy in the U.S.

In fact, it’s almost impossible to buy clothes or goods anymore without inadvertently supporting the slave trade.” Mann said that the crisis extends far greater than in the African and Asian nations typically associated with slavery or indentured servitude. “After the hurricane in Haiti, the economy was so devastated, with as many as 3,000 people sold into slavery right there in their own country,” she added. “It affects all racial groups and slaves come from every single continent on the planet. The irony is that there are more slaves now that slavery is illegal than there were when it was a legal part of international commerce. Moreover, because of its illegal nature, it’s practically impossible to track and contain. It’s not a matter of how to stop it. It’s a matter of how we even begin to address it.”

One of the reasons Mann wrote her book was to establish an awareness of the problem, so that people could have a frame of reference for action. “The wrongs of the past as well as the present must continue to be exposed so that they can be righted in the present and future,” Mann added. “This means educating society about evil and injustice and motivating them to take steps to ease others’ pain and anguish. The key is to get people aware of it, and then let them know what they can do to end the practice. In America, the first thing we need to do is address our own consumer habits. To help, the United Nations has created an online and mobile phone application to help people track if what they buy is supporting slavers.”

Lucia Man at Book SigningMann said the awareness and concern of the American people are the first steps to ending slavery around the world. “If there is no money to be made from enslaving people, it will end,” she said. “Many innocent people become the victims of viciousness or the prey of prejudice. While fear and anger are filling the cells and souls of innocents, the rest of us can bolster their spirits and lighten their load by having the guts to fight their fight and the heart to bring hope to humanity. Courage and commitment are powerful weapons, and we should not hesitate to use them against the dishonorable people of the world.”

CBC_logo_200In 2011, Lucia Mann was given the Bronze Award by "Character Building Counts Book Awards," in recognition of her of raising of awareness of human trafficking, through her many writings and publications.

English

It is hard for a person to get more worldly than Lucia Mann. The journalist-turned-activist-turned-novelist has traveled to the farthest reaches of the globe. She likes dangerous places. Where life is cheap is where Lucia wants to go. Her Sicilian blood makes her curious. She is an adventurer who wants to help. She brings the struggles of the world’s victims to today’s readers.

Lucia’s latest novel, The Little Breadwinner: War and Survival in The Salvadoran Heartland is set in the Latin American country where one human crisis follows another. The main character is Estrella Lozano, a young woman caught up in revolution, repression and the CIA backed government.

El Salvador, as were many countries in Latin America, was caught between to primary powers, the United States on one hand and Cuba and communist satellites of the Soviet Union on the other. Lucia relays in her introduction a history of conflict and geopolitical factors at work in El Salvador. She writes: “Equivalent to 0.08% of the total world population, El Salvador is known to have been beleaguered by violence and overwhelming crushing poverty due to over-population and class struggles in which most Salvadoran citizens were affected.”

In an online interview with PRIMO in August, Lucia claimed her experiences as a journalist led her to write her latest novel. “Fluent in Spanish, I traveled to El Salvador in the late 80s to uncover the ‘truth’ about the United States government’s involvement in this ‘dirty’ war,” she says. “It was my personal interactions with a couple of rebel fighters and several impoverished, downtrodden Salvadorans that inspired my latest book, which has taken many years in the making.”

Although much of the book covers events of the last 40 years in El Salvador, the author provides important background about the main character Estrella. She comes from a family with deep yet complex roots in Latin America. There are connections to native tribes in the Amazon and Christian missionaries.

The Little Breadwinner is a fascinating novel that transports readers to the dangerous geopolitical struggles of El Salvador and other countries in Latin America. When asked in her interview if things have improved in El Salvador, Lucia said: “As a matter of fact, it is far worse since the civil war ended. Today, this Latin American country remains in the grip of fierce gang violence. My concern is that many Salvadorans are facing a death sentence.”

— PRIMO Magazine

The Little Breadwinner by Lucia Mann is, as the subtitle suggests, a tale of war and survival in El Salvador, a story that captures the devastating experience of the Civil War from 1980 to 1992. It is often said that when elephants fight, the grass suffers, and this book is a powerful statement that crystallizes the saying. The author plunges the reader into a world of chaos, where tyranny takes control of the streets and where vulnerable people suffer from the atrocities committed by the military firing squad. It is against this backdrop that Estrella Godwin Lozano, a woman
traumatized by the horrors orchestrated by the National Guard soldiers outside her pueblo home, takes up arms and joins the Sandinistas to seek revenge. Can she survive the struggle?

This is an engrossing historical narrative that explores the misery of war and as one reads, one is appalled at man's inhumanity to man, the horror of war, and what the quest for power can lead to. The book is written in a highly descriptive style and the author takes readers on a painful journey down the path of history. As I read this book, I couldn't help but think about situations in other countries like Cameroon where the military wage war against civilians and where children and the most vulnerable suffer. Lucia Mann's book isn't written to entertain readers, but to draw
their attention to facts about war and how cruel it is to support it. The descriptions are strong, the prose beautiful, but it is the humanity of the characters, the resilient spirit of a female protagonist that makes the story a gripping read. The Little Breadwinner: War and Survival in the Salvadoran Heartland is a heart-wrenching story of the Civil War in El Salvador, written with a lot of clarity and passion.

—Christian Sia, Readers' Favorite

The Little Breadwinner: War and Survival in the Salvadoran Heartland is a harrowing tale about the many faces of war, written by Lucia Mann. The book folds and unfolds the narratives of several generations across different lands and times, but perhaps the biggest feat of the read is that it offers an account of the civil war of El Salvador. What is more, the author was on location at the time of the civil war so the subject has an added personal resonance.

If you are not familiar with the Salvadoran Civil War (1979-1992), this is a great opportunity to learn about it. At the beginning of the book, you can find a map and chronology of the events that serve as a general guideline for the pages that follow. The two sides that were in conflict for more than 12 years were the military-led junta government and a coalition of left-winged groups, the Farabundo Martí National Liberation Front (FMLN). The US-funded government death-squads conducted a methodic terror campaign against civilians that added up to a long list of human rights violations (forceful recruiting of child soldiers, massacres, attacks, and rapes). A lot of people were killed and a lot of people simply disappeared. Their exact number remains unknown, but the UN reports a victim count of over 75,000, as far as those killed during the long civil war. It all finally ended with the Chapultepec Peace Accords.

The Little Breadwinner encompasses the civil war, but goes beyond it and captures some of the late after-effects of a tough decade. Lucia Mann starts with some apparently disjointed cold facts about the Salvadorian Civil War, but as the pages progress, her approach turns more personal as she tells us a multi-generational story. She frequently interjects with personal observations and comments that sometimes jolt the reader out of the immersive experience.

One of the main characters is Estrella Godwin Lozano, a person with a short stature that becomes “the little breadwinner” for her family living in poverty. She is the descendant of the Waorani tribe from the Amazonian rainforest. Her birth mother was a gifted tribe member and her gift passed down between generations being particularly strong in Estrella’s case. Yet, this special soul was not ordained for an easy life; she faced many hardships and challenges, the worst of which was brought on by the civil war.

The Little Breadwinner reveals the personal narratives of the victims of the Salvadorian Civil War. The book is based on real events but presents these in a fictionalized form. Lucia Mann, a passionate and worldly activist, a prolific writer, tells yet another unique story about the oppressed and suffering trying to fight against the current of fate.

—Barnes & Noble reviews
☆☆☆☆☆ 5 out of 5 stars. An Excellent Read!

The Little Breadwinner: War and Survival in the Salvadoran Heartland is a harrowing tale about the many faces of war, written by Lucia Mann. The book folds and unfolds the narratives of several generations across different lands and times, but perhaps the biggest feat of the read is that it offers an account of the civil war of El Salvador. What is more, the author was on location at the time of the civil war so the subject has an added personal resonance.

If you are not familiar with the Salvadoran Civil War (1979-1992), this is a great opportunity to learn about it. At the beginning of the book, you can find a map and chronology of the events that serve as a general guideline for the pages that follow. The two sides that were in conflict for more than 12 years were the military-led junta government and a coalition of left-winged groups, the Farabundo Martí National Liberation Front (FMLN). The US-funded government death-squads conducted a methodic terror campaign against civilians that added up to a long list of human rights violations (forceful recruiting of child soldiers, massacres, attacks, and rapes). A lot of people were killed and a lot of people simply disappeared. Their exact number remains unknown, but the UN reports a victim count of over 75,000, as far as those killed during the long civil war. It all finally ended with the Chapultepec Peace Accords.

The Little Breadwinner encompasses the civil war, but goes beyond it and captures some of the late after-effects of a tough decade. Lucia Mann starts with some apparently disjointed cold facts about the Salvadorian Civil War, but as the pages progress, her approach turns more personal as she tells us a multi-generational story. She frequently interjects with personal observations and comments that sometimes jolt the reader out of the immersive experience.

One of the main characters is Estrella Godwin Lozano, a person with a short stature that becomes “the little breadwinner” for her family living in poverty. She is the descendant of the Waorani tribe from the Amazonian rainforest. Her birth mother was a gifted tribe member and her gift passed down between generations being particularly strong in Estrella’s case. Yet, this special soul was not ordained for an easy life; she faced many hardships and challenges, the worst of which was brought on by the civil war.

The Little Breadwinner reveals the personal narratives of the victims of the Salvadorian Civil War. The book is based on real events but presents these in a fictionalized form. Lucia Mann, a passionate and worldly activist, a prolific writer, tells yet another unique story about the oppressed and suffering trying to fight against the current of fate.

—Timea Barabas

loading