The Genocidal Genealogy of Francoism

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More About This Title The Genocidal Genealogy of Francoism

English

The Francoist command in the Spanish Civil War carried out a programme of mass violence from the start of the conflict. Through a combination of death squads and the use of military trials around 150,000 Spaniards met their deaths. However, the July 1936 uprising was not only aimed at ending the Republican regime, but had ideological goals: preventing the supposed Bolshevik Revolution, defending the ‘unity of Spain’ and reversing center-left social and cultural reforms. Public debate over Francosim brings with it substantive disagreements. The Genocidal Genealogy of Francoism engages with the root causes of these disagreements. Violence and the memory of violence are viewed as part of a single phenomenon that has continued to the present, a process that is located within a comparative framework that analyzes the Spanish case beyond the debate between Francoism and anti-Francoism. The author explains the political and judicial proceedings in recent Spanish history with regard to its violent past and the implications for international justice initiatives.

English

Antonio Miguez Macho (1979) is lecturer at the University of Santiago de Compostela. He has spent time as a researcher at The London School of Economics and Political Science and the Universidad Nacional de Tres de Febrero (Buenos Aires). He has published extensively on twentieth-century Spanish political and social history. He is the author of “Challenging Impunity in Spain throughout the Concept of Genocidal Practices”, in P. Anderson and M.A. del Arco Blanco (eds.), Mass Killings and Violence in Spain, 1936-1952.
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